Copper Spur UL2 Review

Tried and True Comfort

Big Agnes Copper Spur

The Copper Spur is a time tested, well built tent from Big Agnes.  In this review of the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2, you’ll see why it’s been loved by backpackers and hunters for many years, this tent is full of features and provides you with a good amount of space, both in the vestibules and interior. 

Overall, the Copper Spur performed well in both the wind and rain tests.  There were, however, a few annoyances.  The minor annoyances wouldn’t make me shy away from this tent though.  The Copper Spur uses a ripstop nylon fabric that is polyurethane treated on the underside of the fly.  Big Agnes tested the Copper Spur up to a 1200mm hydrostatic rating.

The Good

Set Up

The Copper Spur is a breeze to set up and the doors were big and easy to get in and out of.  The cross member poles at the top of the tent keep the side walls from sagging and increase the amount of livable space inside the tent.

Freestanding

The Copper Spur is a true free standing tent.  This comes in handy if you are forced to set up camp in a rocky area where getting a stake in the ground may prove difficult.  If you frequently find yourself in that situation, the Copper Spur is going to be a great option.

The BaD

Zippers

The zippers weren’t the smoothest of the tents and often hung up, requiring a second hand to finish zipping the door.   

Tension Pulls

One thing that really surprised me about the Copper Spur was that it didn’t feature tension pulls on the vestibules.  This made tightening the rain fly more difficult because it required resetting the two fly stakes.  Not a big deal, but kind of annoying.  This became noticeable when the rain hit and the material began to sag a bit.  I couldn’t just go give it a pull and get the fly tight again. It required pulling the stake.  

Rain
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2

Of all the tents, the Copper Spur was the most affected by the rain.  The fly noticeably sagged after 12 hours of rain, but not enough to cause it to touch the interior of the tent.  I believe this is a product of the polyurethane coating being on the underside of the fly.  This method of waterproofing allows moisture to soak into the material, however, the Copper Spur stayed bone dry.

Check out the Copper Spur

The Copper Spur was my favorite freestanding shelters. Split this already lightweight tent with a friend and you won’t be disappointed. It’s been a long time favorite for both backpackers an hunters. See how it stacks up against some others I tested in our full Backpacking Tent Review!

Check out Backcountry Camp Part 1: Basics of Selecting a Tent to help select the right tent for you.

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